Insights

Picture of Scott Evernham

Knowing your personal information may have been stolen or exposed is scary.

Unfortunately, reports of the large data breaches occurring in the US and across the world are all too common, and it's likely you or someone you know has been impacted. Here at Old National, we are committed to protecting our customer’s data. The steps below are ways all of us can pro-actively monitor and manage this risk.

The primary steps

Monitor bank account, debit card and credit card activity. Review your bank account activity and report suspicious transactions. Customers who use Old National Online Banking also have the ability to activate automated mobile alerts that will inform you when large transactions occur on your account. Old National debit and HELOC card users can receive purchase alerts, decline transactions or suspend their card through Card Controls in Old National’s Online Banking and Mobile App. Credit card companies often offer a similar service, allowing customers to quickly identify fraudulent transactions.

Add a “security phrase” to bank accounts. A simple yet effective way to protect your account information is to add a password or security phrase to all bank accounts. This will prompt the client services department to request this password when the bank receives a call requesting information on your account or related transactions. Old National customers may visit any of our banking centers or call customer service at 1-800-731-2265 to request a security phrase be added to your accounts.

Freeze your credit. As a consumer, you have the ability to place a freeze on your credit report which prevents fraudsters from opening credit lines in your name. Freezing and un-freezing (thawing) your credit is a free service provided by the three major credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) and a fourth credit agency known as Innovis.

To freeze your credit files, this can be completed by visiting the following websites:

Monitoring the three major credit bureaus. Anyone can do this for free once each year at www.annualcreditreport.com. Rather than checking all three reports at once, spread monitoring throughout the year, checking a different credit report each time. 

Some additional steps

While the actions I've covered so far are considered most critical for reducing the risk of fraud and identity theft, these additional steps are an effective part of a more comprehensive strategy.

Opting out of pre-approved credit offers. Anyone can do this at OptOutPrescreen.com.

Completing tax returns ASAP. A breach can give fraudsters the information needed to commit tax refund fraud. The best way to guard against this possibility is to complete and submit your taxes as soon as you have all the required forms. This can prevent a fraudster from filing first and inappropriately receiving your tax refund check.

Establishing an account at ssa.gov/myaccount. Setting up an account with the Social Security Administration allows you to monitor your annual earnings to ensure a fraudster is not using your SSN for employment purposes. Setting up the account also ensures a fraudster cannot create an account in your name to gain further access to your information.

For additional things you and your family can do to reduce your risk of fraud and identity theft, learn more by visiting the Old National Security Center.

More ways to avoid being a victim of fraud

Find more articles and videos about detecting scams and protecting yourself from financial fraud.




Scott is a member of Old National's Executive Leadership Group, responsible for guiding the organization at its highest level. He joined Old National in 2003 as Associate Counsel and has served as President of Old National Insurance and Old National Wealth Management. He most recently assumed the position of Chief Risk Officer.

This content is not intended to provide legal, tax, accounting, financial or investment advice or indicate the suitability of any product or service for your unique circumstances. You are encouraged to consult with a qualified legal, tax, accounting, financial or investment professional based on your specific circumstances. We do not make any warranties as to accuracy or completeness of this information, do not endorse any third-party companies, products, or services described here, and take no liability for your use of this information.
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